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Skip Navigation LinksFrequently Asked Questions (PCA)

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1. What does the Price Control Act Cover?

​2. What does maximum and minimum prices mean?

3. What actions can JPKE take if a complaint was lodged on price-controlled goods?

4. Can I lodge a complaint on goods that are not listed under the Act?

5. What if the business is found guilty for not following the maximum/minimum prices?

6. ​During festive season, does JPKE only regulate the specified goods or any additional goods?

7. What is the reason for an increase in prices of formulated powdered milk or cooking oil in some brand?​

8. Why are there differences in prices for different shops?

9. How often do the price inspectors monitor prices?



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​1What does the Price Control Act Cover?
​The Price Control Act, Chapter 142 regulates the prices and charges of goods specified in the law. It is important to note that not all goods sold in Brunei are regulated by this law because price intervention through the Price Control Act is only used for staple and essential goods with public policy justifications. This is to ensure prices of goods are determined in a free market through the basic economic forces of supply and demand, in order to maintain a healthy and fair business environment.

There are currently 22 goods listed in the Act as price controlled goods. There are currently 22 goods listed in the Order as price controlled goods. These include:
      i)    Household items – rice, sugar, cooking oil, formulated powdered milk, creamer, plain flour; 
      ii)​   Energy – Motor gasoline (Premium 97, Regular 85 and Super 92), diesel fuel, dual purpose kerosene, bottled liquefied 
            petroleum gas; 
      iii)​  Construction materials; and 
      iv)  ​Passenger motor vehicles

These specific goods will be reviewed from time to time.

Businesses are required to comply with the price control regulations and are not allowed to charge prices above the maximum set for the specific goods.​ ​
​2
What does maximum and minimum prices mean?
​A maximum price means to set specified goods at the maximum limit (price ceiling). Businesses are not allowed to sell the goods beyond the set price limit.

A minimum price means to set specified goods at the minimum limit (price floor). Businesses are not allowed to sell the goods below the set price limit.
​3What actions can JPKE take if a complaint was lodged on price-controlled goods?​
​JPKE will analyze the complaint to ensure that it is within scope of the Price Control Act (Chapter 142) and that all relevant details such as the evidences are provided. If the complaint falls within the scope of the act with all the relevant documents, an investigation will be carried out. It must be understood that not all goods are under the purview of the Price Control Act.
              
The CAD will routinely monitor price-controlled goods through spot checks or price inspections to the outlets.
​4
​Can I lodge a complaint on goods that are not listed under the Act?
​No. Goods that are not listed under the Act are not regulated by the law. Therefore complaints lodged against them cannot be processed.
​5
What if the business is found guilty for not following the maximum/minimum prices? ​
​Action can be taken accordingly as follow:
     a)  Compound not exceeding B$1,000
     b)  Penalty of B$5,000 and imprisonment for 2 years
     c)  Penalty of B$20,000 and imprisonment for 5 years for subsequent offence
​6
​During festive season, does JPKE only regulate the specified goods or any additional goods?
During festive seasons, JPKE administratively regulates maximum prices of 13 types of foodstuff namely chicken, eggs, beef, butter, margarine, Ghee, milk (condensed and evaporated), flour, coconut milk, chocolate hazelnut spread, cashew nut, popia skin and dried shrimp chili powder.
​7
What is the reason for an increase in prices of formulated powdered milk or cooking oil in some brand?​
An increase in prices in some brands might be due to the addition of new ingredients, use of new packaging, adding up of weightage and so on. However, prices set by businesses must not be above the maximum price limit. If found guilty, action will be taken accordingly (refer to question number 6). ​ ​
​8
​Why are there differences in prices for different shops?
Prices vary from shop to shop whether in department store, supermarket or grocery store (such as kedai runcit) because some may buy in bulk, which generate lower average unit cost. Other factors include rental, location, transportation and so forth. Therefore, consumers are urged to be smart in comparing prices between shops.​
​9
How often do the price inspectors monitor prices?
​The inspectors monitor prices of regulated goods in all four districts in the country. They do monitoring on a monthly basis. Other than routine work on monthly monitoring, they also carry out spot-checks on a random basis and upon receiving consumer complaints.